Displaying items by tag: classification

Friday, 01 May 2015 03:55

Cleanroom classifications

Cleanrooms are classified according to the number and size of particles permitted per volume of air. Large numbers like "class 100" or "class 1000" refer to FED-STD-209E, and denote the number of particles of size 0.5 µm or larger permitted per cubic foot of air. The standard also allows interpolation, so it is possible to describe, for example, "class 2000".

Published in Resources
Tuesday, 01 December 2015 04:32

Cleanroom Terminology

As-build - A clean room that is complete and ready for operation, with all services connected and functional, but without production equipment or personnel in the room.

Operational - A term used to describe a clean room in normal operation with all services functioning and with production equipment and personnel present and performing their normal work functions.

Published in Resources
Tagged under
Monday, 01 February 2016 04:32

Determining Cleanroom Classification

One of the most important factors that you have to determine when constructing a cleanroom is what size of particle you will need to filter out. Is it any size particle? Is it a specific size or range of particles? Most often you find that people look at the cleanroom classification and they go to the lowest level particle count to determine what classification they need.

Published in Resources
Monday, 01 February 2016 04:32

Higher classification than needed?

Every time you go down a class, or up a class, for instance from an ISO 8 (class 100,000) to an ISO 7 (class 10,000), that’s going to take twice as much air. The cost of filtering and moving air is a significant cost of operating a clean room. This process translates all the way down through to the number of filters that you need, the amount of return air space that you need, the amount of air conditioning you need to cool that return air and so forth. And this multiplies itself as you go through the process.

Published in Resources
Tagged under
Monday, 01 February 2016 04:32

Does classification affect cost?

Everything depends on the amount of air cleanliness that is required; the number of filters you need, the amount of CFM that you need – everything is a result of that decision. Therefore, that decision sets the tone for every other decision that has to do with designing and constructing a clean room. And it adds the cost up front, as well as the operational cost.

Published in Resources
Tagged under
Sunday, 01 January 2017 08:03

Cleanroom Classification

There are a lot of determining factors involved in choosing a cleanroom classification and every industry has a default standard to start with. In medical device packaging for instance, the default classification is ISO 7 (or a class 10,000) cleanroom.

Published in Resources
Tagged under