Displaying items by tag: HVAC

Thursday, 01 April 2021 09:35

HVAC cleanroom calculation explained

Cleanroom HVAC engineering is not an easy thing. It takes a mix of engineering skills, understanding the particle-generating potential of the process, and experience.

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Tuesday, 01 December 2015 04:32

Cleanroom HVAC Systems

The 4 important air-conditioning design considerations for clean room system design are: 

  1. Supplying airflow in sufficient volume and cleanliness to support the cleanliness rating of the room.
  2. Introducing air in a manner to prevent stagnant areas where particles could accumulate.
  3. Conditioning air to meet clean-room temperature, humidity and filtration requirements.
  4. Ensuring enough conditioned makeup air to maintain the specified positive pressurization. 
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Tuesday, 01 December 2015 04:32

HVAC vs conventional systems

Clean room design encompasses much more than traditional temperature and humidity control. Design must consider aspects such as control of particulate, microbial, electrostatic discharge, gaseous contaminants, airflow pattern control, and pressurization and industrial engineering 

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Sunday, 01 May 2016 03:06

Basic elements of Cleanroom

FAB Cleanroom

In the microelectronics industry a semiconductor fabrication plant (commonly called a fab; sometimes foundry) is a factory where devices such as integrated circuits are manufactured.

A business that operates a semiconductor fab for the purpose of fabricating the designs of other companies, such as fabless semiconductor companies, is known as a foundry. If a foundry does not also produce its own designs, it is known as a pure-play semiconductor foundry.

Fabs require many expensive devices to function. Estimates put the cost of building a new fab over one billion U.S. dollars with values as high as $3–4 billion not being uncommon. TSMC invested $9.3 billion in its Fab15 300 mm wafer manufacturing facility in Taiwan.[1]

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Friday, 01 July 2016 03:05

Cleanroom Air Handlers

Getting the specification and design right the first time is very important since HVAC is integrated into a building’s framework, making modifications both time consuming and expensive. Additionally, the design, installation, commissioning, and qualification of cleanroom HVAC systems is one of the top considerations in many industries, particularly for pharmaceutical, biotechnology manufacturing facilities. With these conditions in mind, CAT will develop a custom, compliant system to help maintain each cleanroom’s clean environment by allowing the appropriate volume of clean air to each room at a precise temperature and humidity per your requirements.

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Friday, 01 July 2016 03:05

Cleanroom Consulting

Cleanroom Industries can prepare the needed wealth of information specific to designing thru certification of your cleanroom.

Our design team can provide AutoCAD cleanroom design services for most cleanroom projects for architectural, structural, mechanical and electrical disciplines. A thorough inspection of the proposed job site is usually required and includes field measurements, identifying column locations, photographs of the important items and interferences, items to be scheduled for demolition and discussing the total CAD requirements directly with the customer. The number of personnel making the on-site inspections and the number of trips required is determined by the size, duration and phases of the project. Other topics covered by our cleanroom designers include: international design standards, the economics of cleanroom design, high efficiency air filtration, materials used in cleanroom construction, and the provision of clean gases and water.

The design drawings resulting from this process can also be reviewed and sealed by CAT's staff professional cleanroom engineers, registered in the particular state the project is in. The drawings are then ready to be submitted to the local building and code authority for approval and permits. CAT stands ready to make the cleanroom design process a success given any cleanroom requirement.

Our cleanroom design experience is broad based including FDA validatable multi-user/multi-product facilities; medical, pharmacuetical, microbial/cell culture, gene therapy, and health sciences facilities; aseptic filling, medical device, semiconductor, electronic, optics, military/aerospace, and manufacturing cleanrooms.

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Thursday, 01 December 2016 03:05

HVAC System

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems (HVAC). CLIN AC modules maintain the narrow temperature range required by garbed personnel and sensitive equipment inside a modular cleanroom.

Several configurations are available, with return air recirculated through Vertical Air Return modules mounted outside the cleanroom or directly through the cleanroom panels.

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Friday, 01 June 2018 06:15

Cleanroom Design Impacts Classification

Clients often come to me specifically requesting an “ISO 7 cleanroom” or an “ISO 8 cleanroom.” What they often fail to realize is that the ISO class does not define the layout of the cleanroom. It only defines the cleanliness level that needs to be met. In fact, the ISO classification actually corresponds to a specification of how clean the cleanroom must be. The ISO 14464-1 standard doesn’t say how to design the cleanroom, it only specifies the maximum quantity of air particles allowed.

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Thursday, 01 November 2018 09:40

Cleanroom HVAC Clean and Working

If you have a cleanroom, you need to take care of your HVAC. Here are 5 checkpoints to keep you running efficiently and economically.

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Thursday, 01 November 2018 09:38

Remove Dense Dust from Cleanrooms

While the advanced air filtration systems in modern cleanroom HVACs trap most dust particles, cross contamination from dust is still a concern. Dense dust, which has high water content, and metal-containing dust can easily find its way into cleanrooms via things like the corrosion of faucets and plumbing or technician clothing. A careful protocol is necessary to remove these dust particles and avoid spreading contaminates during cleaning.

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