Displaying items by tag: construction

Tuesday, 04 May 2021 15:05

Microelectronics Cleanroom Construction

Product integrity and throughput suffers when airborne particles or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) invade microelectronics environments. Depending on the application, one particular size particle or contaminant characterization may be more problematic than another.

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Wednesday, 01 July 2015 03:55

Cleanroom lighting fixture construction

Contamination control is the primary design goal of any cleanroom. Any potential source of contamination into the cleanroom must be thoroughly evaluated and minimized. Lighting fixtures should be subjected to contamination evaluation. Unfortunately, there are no established standards to prequalify fixtures for a particular cleanroom class. The National Sanitary Foundation (NSF) does provide listing and testing of materials used in food, pharmaceutical, medical or other FDA applications. Fixtures used in these applications should be required to carry the NSF listing mark. Manufacturers often advertise fixtures as being suitable for cleanroom use with no data or standard qualifications to substantiate their claims.

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Tuesday, 01 March 2016 05:34

Modern vs traditional construction

I’m a big proponent of modular construction, but modular construction isn’t always the right answer. Every instance and every situation is different. One of the things that you have to do is analyze where your clean room is being built, and what the motivators are for you build that clean room. For example, if you’re going to build a cleanroom within an existing area and you’re going to build it within the limits of that existing area, then a modular clean room might not be the answer.

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Tuesday, 01 March 2016 04:32

Advantages of Modular

Modular construction lends itself to increasing your speed, cleanliness and quality of construction. Let me explain - speed is pretty easy. Modular construction is manufactured off-site and erected on site. So constructing a building with modular components takes less time and therefore projects can be completed much quicker.

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Wednesday, 01 June 2016 03:06

Cleanroom Initial plan

The Initial Plan for Factory Construction

• Type of product, product capacity, and design specification
• Calculation of the cleanroom area
• Consideration on airflow, cleanliness, and cleanroom category
• The arrangement for process equipment
• Classification data collection for process equipment's facility requirement(Include water, electricity, gas)
• Moving lines of the process, relocation, shipping, personnel access arrangements
• The location arrangement, safety and convenience consideration for factory system
• Factories funding and milestone planning
• The investigation on the environment special requirement of the product 
• Reserved for future development and expansion
• Environmental Protection Impact Assessment Plan

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Wednesday, 01 June 2016 03:06

Five stages control at construction

As the demand for complex cleanrooms in the life sciences grows, construction challenges mount. Making the right decisions during the building and commissioning phases of cleanrooms will help to ensure that they are successful, better integrated, more operable and sustainable. Generally speaking, teamwork among designers, operators, maintenance people and builders that focuses on project timelines will achieve the best results. The suggestions below will help drug and device manufacturers step back and better envision the whole facility during the build process.

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Sunday, 01 January 2017 08:03

Cleanroom Construction Materials

The question of modular versus conventional clean room construction is increasingly common in high-tech industries, and one that may have a different answer depending on each individual project. Speed to market, however, is critical for almost all manufacturing companies, and it’s particularly important for the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industries, which need to maximize the patent protection period after what is usually a long and expensive product development cycle. It’s also crucial for the microelectronics industry where technology changes on a near-daily basis.

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Sunday, 01 January 2017 08:03

Construction Regulations and Standards

Any construction project, whether cleanroom-related or not, is subject to building codes. Regardless of construction technique, the overall objective of a building project is the same. The components of the clean room facility must satisfy local and national building regulations for fire protection and structural design. Materials are required to meet minimal flame and smoke development requirements (Class A non-combustible) or have fire separation walls (1- or 2-hour fire-rated for hazardous areas).

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Sunday, 01 January 2017 08:03

Case for Modular Construction

Modular clean room construction can offer a number of important advantages over conventional (stick-build) approaches. For example, modular walls are an inherently dry construction material with little or no modification required for installation, thus minimizing dust generation. Modular systems can also be manufactured from materials that are non-shedding and non-particulating.

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Sunday, 01 January 2017 08:03

Cleanroom Construction Process

While there are discrete steps in the design and construction of a cleanroom, those projects deemed successful incorporate certain practices that promote flow of the construction process toward completion on time and within budget. Proper front end planning is not completed until it results in appropriate values for design parameters; "buy-in" at all levels of management, and clear direction for the design phase. Engineering the cleanroom in accordance with recognized industry practice would produce construction documents that facilitate clear procurement and construction planning as well as a focused, efficient, construction effort. A full return on the energy expended through the construction phase cannot be realized without a well-executed start-up and certification process that provides baseline data for effective operation and maintenance. This paper describes the steps in the cleanroom design/construction undertaking and offers practical suggestions on how to avoid pitfalls along the way.

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